Category Archives: Michael Banner

Louvain Studies special issue on ‘relation, vulnerability, love’

by Lieve Orye Several treads of thought woven at the conference in 2016 have been rewoven into paper and digital format. A Louvain Studies issue has been published recently with contributions of several keynote speakers and respondents. Under the menu … Continue reading

Posted in Being human, Brian Brock, Elina Hankela, Jan-Olav Henriksen, Liz Gandolfo, Love, Markus Muhling, Michael Banner, Paul Fiddes, Relationality, Vulnerability

Troubling kinship and alternative kinning

Excerpt from Banner, M. (2014) The Ethics of Everyday Life.  chapter 2 ‘Conceiving Conception: On IVF, Virgin Births, and the Troubling of Kinship’. In staccato fashion, the Apostles’ Creed notices paradigmatically human moments in Christ’s life: he was conceived, born, … Continue reading

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Remembrance, grief, ties and re-tying

Excerpt from Banner, M. (2014) The Ethics of Everyday Life.  chapter 7 ‘Remembering Christ and Making Time Count: On the Practice and Politics of Memory’, p.175-176; 190-191; 195-197. Christianity is a practice of remembering …I suggest that in the practice … Continue reading

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Doctrine of the human

Excerpts from ‘A Doctrine of Human Being’, a chapter written by Michael Banner, part of The Doctrine of God and Theological Ethics,  Alan J. Torrance & Michael Banner (eds.)(A&C Black, 2006). Being human with and for others, as achievement, as divine … Continue reading

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Imagining the human

Excerpts from The Ethics of Everyday Life: Moral Theology, Social Anthropology, and the Imagination of the Human. Michael Banner (2014). Being human lived out, contested These credal moments of conception, birth, suffering, death, and burial are not only paradigmatically human, … Continue reading

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